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16-Jul-2016 23:00

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Our pricing has changed due to an OFCOM change in regulation which came into effect on 1st Jul 2015.

Because it's hilarious to hear random telemarketers describe their favorite brand of toothpaste?

And the kicker is the last bit:"Do you have a problem answering questions from a stranger on the telephone?

There are two things to like here: 1) No one like solicitation calls and its nice to see someone stick it to them and 2) he is shifting the economics to be more representative of the costs to all parties. So he gets 60 minutes/hour * 15 cents/minute * 1 dollar/100 cents = 9 dollars per hour talking on the phone?Yeah I was kinda surprised in the US, I got a "burner" for about (at Walgreens, IIRC), charged it with (ok), and it barely last me 3 weeks with minimal usage. But apparently that doesn't make any difference.I did enjoy the fact that this simple dumbphone had a very easy-to-use "tip calculator", making it easier to adapt to the local customs :) (until I found out that apparently tip percentage are calculated before-taxes, not over the full bill? It takes exactly 90 days for a bill to show up with the discount when you have a FAN id (corp discount). because after 90 days you can't cancel the 2yr contract anymore, and then you learn that the 30% only applies to voice, for the first line. data tax and ridiculous fees (like /mo for the ferederal universal access fee.AFAIK, receiving calls in the UK is generally free (as in, it doesn't count as minutes as it does in the US), and the calling party foots the bill. Got in the US after growing up a decently regulated coutry. Used phone first week to do a few conference calls to a 1-800 week i was already out of "plan minutes" because i had to 'pay' for the 1800 to mention SMS costs, and data being billed up to 3x (actual data plan, smart phone plan (), tethering (-50), plus tax)Try getting a different plan.T-mobile's unlimited data plan with limited monthly minutes is / month. They nominally charge extra for tethering, but tethering worked just fine for me without actually buying the "service". Summary: the problems you're experiencing don't seem to have much to do with what country you're in, so much as your belief that buying a plan with a ton of bizarre extra costs makes sense.

There are two things to like here: 1) No one like solicitation calls and its nice to see someone stick it to them and 2) he is shifting the economics to be more representative of the costs to all parties. So he gets 60 minutes/hour * 15 cents/minute * 1 dollar/100 cents = 9 dollars per hour talking on the phone?

Yeah I was kinda surprised in the US, I got a "burner" for about (at Walgreens, IIRC), charged it with (ok), and it barely last me 3 weeks with minimal usage. But apparently that doesn't make any difference.

I did enjoy the fact that this simple dumbphone had a very easy-to-use "tip calculator", making it easier to adapt to the local customs :) (until I found out that apparently tip percentage are calculated before-taxes, not over the full bill? It takes exactly 90 days for a bill to show up with the discount when you have a FAN id (corp discount). because after 90 days you can't cancel the 2yr contract anymore, and then you learn that the 30% only applies to voice, for the first line. data tax and ridiculous fees (like /mo for the ferederal universal access fee.

AFAIK, receiving calls in the UK is generally free (as in, it doesn't count as minutes as it does in the US), and the calling party foots the bill. Got in the US after growing up a decently regulated coutry. Used phone first week to do a few conference calls to a 1-800 week i was already out of "plan minutes" because i had to 'pay' for the 1800 to mention SMS costs, and data being billed up to 3x (actual data plan, smart phone plan (), tethering (-50), plus tax)Try getting a different plan.

T-mobile's unlimited data plan with limited monthly minutes is / month. They nominally charge extra for tethering, but tethering worked just fine for me without actually buying the "service". Summary: the problems you're experiencing don't seem to have much to do with what country you're in, so much as your belief that buying a plan with a ton of bizarre extra costs makes sense.

It does too in Europe, at least, when calling internationally to cell phones; the caller pays up until the border, the cell phone owner pays after that.