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01-Nov-2016 01:49

Over time, personality had more of an impact on how desirable someone was. Their rankings reflected their personal preferences about the non-physical attributes of the other people in the class.Where one classmate might find a student’s earnestness in class endearing, another might dislike it.Three months later, though, the researchers asked the same students to rate their classmates again.Lo and behold, many of the ratings had changed: the students’ opinions of who was datable had been informed by time together in class.

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And only one friend wants the master bedroom, because it's on the 3rd floor.

Do acquaintances overlook physical appearance because they know each other’s personality and unique attributes?

Is dating less of a “competitive market” when it’s among friends rather than at a bar or a house party?

There’s no reason couples like that should stand out—except for the fact that they are so rare. of dating, “but there's just no compelling evidence that those preferences [matter] once people actually meet face-to-face.” Experiments run by OKCupid, a dating site that matches singles by asking them which qualities they care about in a partner, the idea of “assortative mating”: the hypothesis that people generally date and marry partners who are like them in terms of social class, educational background, race, personality, and, of course, attractiveness.

Seeing it can set off an uncharitable search for an explanation. There is an exception, however, to this seeming rule that people always date equally attractive people: The longer two people know each other before they start dating, the more likely it is that a 3 will date a 6, or a 7 will marry a 10.

And only one friend wants the master bedroom, because it's on the 3rd floor.Do acquaintances overlook physical appearance because they know each other’s personality and unique attributes?Is dating less of a “competitive market” when it’s among friends rather than at a bar or a house party?There’s no reason couples like that should stand out—except for the fact that they are so rare. of dating, “but there's just no compelling evidence that those preferences [matter] once people actually meet face-to-face.” Experiments run by OKCupid, a dating site that matches singles by asking them which qualities they care about in a partner, the idea of “assortative mating”: the hypothesis that people generally date and marry partners who are like them in terms of social class, educational background, race, personality, and, of course, attractiveness.Seeing it can set off an uncharitable search for an explanation. There is an exception, however, to this seeming rule that people always date equally attractive people: The longer two people know each other before they start dating, the more likely it is that a 3 will date a 6, or a 7 will marry a 10.But the ultimate question is whether mixed attractiveness couples are any more or less happy.