Brendan cowell dating

20-Jun-2017 05:27

He was born and grew up in the southern Sydney beachside suburb of Cronulla – his Twitter bio reads “actor writer director dj shark-fan”.

His mum, Yvonne, is a nurse at a Sydney private hospital and his dad, Bruce, is an accountant.

Cowell is still close to his dad, and they share a mutual passion for rugby league and red wine.

“The majority of our conversations centre around the Cronulla Sharks and shiraz, really,” he laughs. Unlike women, we’re not going to go right in and start talking about the big issues.

He started writing poetry and performing when he was in high school, though it didn’t stop him also playing basketball, rugby league and cricket.

Still a cricket tragic – “I fucking love it” – he was a handy leg-spinner but a bit too aggressive with the bat.

“The frustration with cancer is similar to the frustration with another monster called capitalism, and these are two things we may never be able to defeat.” Cowell is looking at the audience of flats again.

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He saw his dad on weekends, when they went to footy and basketball games or “had a cappuccino”.

The pub is across the road from a giant, brutalist public housing block, but the bar is packed with the bearded children of the middle class.

Cowell is sporting three-day growth, shiny and moist after stepping off the stage.

He’s just finished an as-yet-untitled follow-up novel and splits his time between Newtown and London.

Cowell waxes lyrical about the city, his “favourite place”, where he’s been working on a pair of TV concepts for Channel 4 and the BBC: “An original show exploring themes of alcohol and sexuality and a man in crisis, set in Soho; and another one kind of about a literary figure.” Right now, though, he’s licking his steak knife, having just finished a performance of Australian playwright Michael Gow’s new play .

He saw his dad on weekends, when they went to footy and basketball games or “had a cappuccino”.

The pub is across the road from a giant, brutalist public housing block, but the bar is packed with the bearded children of the middle class.

Cowell is sporting three-day growth, shiny and moist after stepping off the stage.

He’s just finished an as-yet-untitled follow-up novel and splits his time between Newtown and London.

Cowell waxes lyrical about the city, his “favourite place”, where he’s been working on a pair of TV concepts for Channel 4 and the BBC: “An original show exploring themes of alcohol and sexuality and a man in crisis, set in Soho; and another one kind of about a literary figure.” Right now, though, he’s licking his steak knife, having just finished a performance of Australian playwright Michael Gow’s new play .

“But also, there are a lot of guys in Australia who are blokey, so it’s probably good to reflect that,” he says.