Datingsweetheart com

17-Aug-2017 19:47

(That's actually how the verb form of intimate, meaning "give to understand; imply as a possibility" is pronounced, but no matter.) I thought this was a clever suggestion, putting a new spin on old words, but I'm not holding my breath for inti-mate to displace boyfriend and girlfriend any time soon.Robert is hardly alone in his feeling that boyfriend and girlfriend are inappropriate terms to refer to grown adults in committed relationships.Maybe it's a different country/different meaning thing but if someone told me their relationship was boyfriend/girlfriend I would assume that they WEREN'T in a committed relationship or living together but in a romantic relationship that is getting serious but not yet engaged to be married or planning to live together.

Works for me, but pronouncing "intimate" like the verb form is both confusing and tin-eared.

In fact, you'd pretty much have to say "business partner" if you meant that, otherwise people would assume you're an item. Everyone who has had a relationship that transcends all words knows that words are no longer necessary and are fortunate indeed. However, when pressed to express consider this: My son is my son even though he was not conceived by me nor delivered from my womb.

"Partner" tends to be used for live-in arrangements, but I know various couples who keep separate homes who use it--it indicates a level of seriousness and interdependence. Although we got married last year, I still refer to my Better Half as my "partner", since it seems to me a more feminist term than "husband" and "wife". I do not feel the need to add "adopted" son when I introduce him as my son or do my taxes.

I've actually resorted to referring to a "significant other," particularly one whose marital/engagement status is unknown to me, as an "S. ZAs a resident of a (very) senior living community I can see the advantage of such a term.

We have 250 units, mostly singly occupied and about a dozen of the 40 or so with couples are unmarried.

Works for me, but pronouncing "intimate" like the verb form is both confusing and tin-eared.In fact, you'd pretty much have to say "business partner" if you meant that, otherwise people would assume you're an item. Everyone who has had a relationship that transcends all words knows that words are no longer necessary and are fortunate indeed. However, when pressed to express consider this: My son is my son even though he was not conceived by me nor delivered from my womb."Partner" tends to be used for live-in arrangements, but I know various couples who keep separate homes who use it--it indicates a level of seriousness and interdependence. Although we got married last year, I still refer to my Better Half as my "partner", since it seems to me a more feminist term than "husband" and "wife". I do not feel the need to add "adopted" son when I introduce him as my son or do my taxes.I've actually resorted to referring to a "significant other," particularly one whose marital/engagement status is unknown to me, as an "S. ZAs a resident of a (very) senior living community I can see the advantage of such a term.We have 250 units, mostly singly occupied and about a dozen of the 40 or so with couples are unmarried.That is - living in NY I encounter this frequently with other singles - when you have a very casual sexual relationship with someone where 'boyfriend' or 'girlfriend' would be making it more serious than it need be but 'lover' sounds dated and falls short of describing the whole relationship.