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06-Mar-2017 07:44

Thank you to everyone for your interest and support of this project.

For the latest observations, click on ' Eagle Diary' below. We see the male and female swap incubating duty an average of 10 times during daylight hours.

SE15’s legacy will be that this information may contribute towards the understanding of how this virus affects raptors.

We have also received a pathology sample for POP (Persistent organic pollutants) testing.

We shall be watching with great interest to see if another eagle appears.

We ask that everyone reports any other eagles seen in the area or nearby. His condition worsened and euthanasia was deemed necessary.

Less than two weeks to go to expected hatch date(s). At night, the female gets up for a stretch and to turn the eggs every 40-60 minutes.

The male has been roosting close by; ether behind the nest, above the nest or on a nearby tree. The ensuing "midnight duets" can probably be heard for miles around! The male brought a very large fish in during the day. Last evening, in the rain and wind, our new female laid an egg.

Fortunately the eggs are well protected deep in the nest bowl. Both eagles are incubating, though again it seems only the female sits at night. We are watching if this different female will again use a tactic of delayed incubation. The climber Tonino was brilliant, hanging on his ropes and fiddling with settings from shouted instructions.This sample, when analysed will be compared to the other data we’ve gathered over the duration of this research project.We would like to thank Taronga Wildlife Hospital for doing such a wonderful job caring for SE15.She then brought it to the branch above the nest and ate it. Our new female "Lady" appears to have accepted our male, and is to his liking as well.Both are bringing in leaves and sticks to build up nest 3 in the ironbark, the nest used last year. We have also observed them side by side on the usual river roost in the mangroves, or nearby.

Fortunately the eggs are well protected deep in the nest bowl. Both eagles are incubating, though again it seems only the female sits at night. We are watching if this different female will again use a tactic of delayed incubation. The climber Tonino was brilliant, hanging on his ropes and fiddling with settings from shouted instructions.

This sample, when analysed will be compared to the other data we’ve gathered over the duration of this research project.

We would like to thank Taronga Wildlife Hospital for doing such a wonderful job caring for SE15.

She then brought it to the branch above the nest and ate it. Our new female "Lady" appears to have accepted our male, and is to his liking as well.

Both are bringing in leaves and sticks to build up nest 3 in the ironbark, the nest used last year. We have also observed them side by side on the usual river roost in the mangroves, or nearby.

A juvenile was photographed flying in the area as well.