Radiocarbon dating trackback uri closed

14-Apr-2017 01:17

The LED array on the probe did not provide much ambient light, so Rover was unable to examine the walls and floor of the chamber, much less the back of the blocking slab.

Even the view of the opposite block was limited by the quality of the light.

The next mission into the Queen’s Chamber shafts would have two primary objectives: Send a robot crawler up QCS to explore the space behind the first blocking slab using the same opening Pyramid Rover had drilled, determine if the rough block at the opposite side was the end of the shaft or another blocking slab, and if the latter, drill a hole through it and see what is behind it.

Send a robot crawler up QCN to drill a hole through blocking slab and see what is on the other side.

radiocarbon dating trackback uri closed-78radiocarbon dating trackback uri closed-25radiocarbon dating trackback uri closed-26

Beginning with Waynman Dixon’s iron rods, researchers have been probing the Great Pyramid’s mysterious claustrophobic passageways for 140 years.

The next mission would have to employ a probe that could fit through the tiny hole already made by Rover.

Damage prevention was not just a consideration with the blocking slab, it had become one of the main criteria of the mission.

What the Pyramid Rover team discovered was a small chamber formed by the Tura limestone U-block, the basal stone, the blocking slab/door, and a rough block of the local limestone on the opposite side, about 19 cm away from the “door.” But the probe camera had its limitations.

It was fixed inside a rigid tube and had no tilt or pan capabilities—all it could do was look straight ahead.

Beginning with Waynman Dixon’s iron rods, researchers have been probing the Great Pyramid’s mysterious claustrophobic passageways for 140 years.

The next mission would have to employ a probe that could fit through the tiny hole already made by Rover.

Damage prevention was not just a consideration with the blocking slab, it had become one of the main criteria of the mission.

What the Pyramid Rover team discovered was a small chamber formed by the Tura limestone U-block, the basal stone, the blocking slab/door, and a rough block of the local limestone on the opposite side, about 19 cm away from the “door.” But the probe camera had its limitations.

It was fixed inside a rigid tube and had no tilt or pan capabilities—all it could do was look straight ahead.

But the pyramid shafts are a different type of spelunking and the Supreme Council of Antiquities was determined that whoever they selected for the next mission would leave no footprints at all.