Teen dating violence statistics in georgia

08-Sep-2016 02:26

Our community experienced a devastating tragedy Sunday evening when three lives were lost and countless others hurt due to domestic violence.Everyone associated with Circle of Hope continues to hold those affected in our prayers.However, research shows that ending, or making attempts to end, a relationship in which power and control are factors is actually more dangerous for the victim.Domestic violence is defined as a pattern of abusive behavior in any relationship that is used by one partner to gain or maintain power and control over another intimate partner.Teen dating violence occurs at alarming rates, and even though Georgia law requires the Board of Education to develop teen dating violence prevention programs for grades 8 -12, implementation is left up to local school boards, and in most local school systems, does not occur.Faith leaders and employers also play an important role in intervention.In almost all of the 126 fatality cases reviewed in the Georgia Fatality Project, the victims were attempting to end the relationship or had already taken steps to end the relationship.

Although Family Violence Intervention Programs are available for offenders of domestic violence, many perpetrators are not ordered to attend the 24 week class, or if they are ordered to attend, they fail to comply with the order and no accountability system is in place to monitor the non-compliance of attendance.However, Georgia is a state that has not passed any clarifying language and therefore local law enforcement agencies and court systems are left to enforce a Federal Law that lacks the clarity needed to address issues surrounding the collection, storage and release of the firearms in domestic violence related cases.In the 126 project reviewed cases, 51% of the victims began their relationship, with the person who eventually killed them, when they were between the ages of 13 and 24.Suzanne Dow is the Executive Director of Circle of Hope, a Habersham County based shelter and service for battered and abused women and their children.Circle of Hope is a private, non-profit, 501(c)3 multi-faceted domestic violence agency whose mission is to support, empower and bring hope to those affected by domestic violence through advocacy, awareness, education and community partnerships.

Although Family Violence Intervention Programs are available for offenders of domestic violence, many perpetrators are not ordered to attend the 24 week class, or if they are ordered to attend, they fail to comply with the order and no accountability system is in place to monitor the non-compliance of attendance.However, Georgia is a state that has not passed any clarifying language and therefore local law enforcement agencies and court systems are left to enforce a Federal Law that lacks the clarity needed to address issues surrounding the collection, storage and release of the firearms in domestic violence related cases.In the 126 project reviewed cases, 51% of the victims began their relationship, with the person who eventually killed them, when they were between the ages of 13 and 24.Suzanne Dow is the Executive Director of Circle of Hope, a Habersham County based shelter and service for battered and abused women and their children.Circle of Hope is a private, non-profit, 501(c)3 multi-faceted domestic violence agency whose mission is to support, empower and bring hope to those affected by domestic violence through advocacy, awareness, education and community partnerships.Those experiencing domestic violence often turn to others – friends, family, co-workers and their pastor – before, or instead of, reaching out to law enforcement or agencies such as Circle of Hope.