Www crewdating com

26-Aug-2016 05:13

As one current second-year English student put it: “One of my friends went on a crew date where the boys had been given a series of tasks beforehand that they were to keep secret from the girls.

One of them was tasked with making misogynistic comments all night, so sat next to make friend making all the typical sexist jokes and remarking about food making you fat every time she ate anything.

Christ Church College all-female drinking society “The Spritzers” describes itself on as “Ch Ch Chunderbirds are go”. Male and female teams’ ratings are duly exchanged after a night out.

It was in part this issue of finding suitable crews to date which led to the creation of – at least online you can have a chance to see who you are going to be crewdating and anticipate the sort of vibe you will get.” Suzanne Holsomback, Vice-President for Women at Oxford University Student Union, said: “‘Lads’ normalise groups with banter and joking, usually by being in a group, which makes them more powerful.

Side effects may include vomiting, the transmission of sexually transmitted infections, and failing academically.” Miserably unsurprising are the stories of sexist behaviour that seem to be ingrained in crewdates.

This echoes research released last month by the University of Sussex on the effect of “lad culture” on women in UK universities – a “ ‘pack culture’ evident in activities such as sport and heavy alcohol consumption, and ‘banter’, which was often sexist, misogynistic and homophobic.” On – a social network for organising crewdates at Oxford and Durham, set up by three graduates – one male team from Oxford wrote that the girls they were dating offered, “good chat, good looks, and some f**king brutal sconces […] Emboldened, we set off with hope in our hearts and fetherlite condoms in our pockets.” But are we right to complain about hotbeds of sexism, and is it all just a jolly jape? Can we call ourselves feminists whilst putting ourselves into situations where “lad culture” thrives?

One of the girls did the same thing back, and I don’t think she was seen as ‘laddish’ for doing so, but I know my friend just sat there feeling pretty demeaned and offended by the whole thing.

” Another female Oxford finalist says that crewdates can typify and exclude males too: “I think that some of my male friends have felt excluded from social situations, due to not being invited to be part of a crewdating society - I think that it was partly a 'clique' issue, but seeing as some were perhaps perceived to be less 'laddish' (i.e.

It was in part this issue of finding suitable crews to date which led to the creation of – at least online you can have a chance to see who you are going to be crewdating and anticipate the sort of vibe you will get.” Suzanne Holsomback, Vice-President for Women at Oxford University Student Union, said: “‘Lads’ normalise groups with banter and joking, usually by being in a group, which makes them more powerful.

Side effects may include vomiting, the transmission of sexually transmitted infections, and failing academically.” Miserably unsurprising are the stories of sexist behaviour that seem to be ingrained in crewdates.

This echoes research released last month by the University of Sussex on the effect of “lad culture” on women in UK universities – a “ ‘pack culture’ evident in activities such as sport and heavy alcohol consumption, and ‘banter’, which was often sexist, misogynistic and homophobic.” On – a social network for organising crewdates at Oxford and Durham, set up by three graduates – one male team from Oxford wrote that the girls they were dating offered, “good chat, good looks, and some f**king brutal sconces […] Emboldened, we set off with hope in our hearts and fetherlite condoms in our pockets.” But are we right to complain about hotbeds of sexism, and is it all just a jolly jape? Can we call ourselves feminists whilst putting ourselves into situations where “lad culture” thrives?

One of the girls did the same thing back, and I don’t think she was seen as ‘laddish’ for doing so, but I know my friend just sat there feeling pretty demeaned and offended by the whole thing.

” Another female Oxford finalist says that crewdates can typify and exclude males too: “I think that some of my male friends have felt excluded from social situations, due to not being invited to be part of a crewdating society - I think that it was partly a 'clique' issue, but seeing as some were perhaps perceived to be less 'laddish' (i.e.

“I'm not a feminist as many people seem to interpret it which basically comes down to resenting men - I'm more of the opinion that you're only treated how you allow yourself to treated, and that women should know how they want to be treated and feel able to speak up for that.” Another female drinking group, MSLS, (profile picture: nuns, with the tagline, “All the single ladies”) rate a crewdate with the all-male “1923 Committee”: “Lads were quick to establish tough drinking rules but they unfortunately came off worse than us, also their pretence at laddiness disappeared as we impressively out-bantered them.” So it seems girls and guys rate each other with similar gusto.